Oral Presentations

Day 1: Parallel Session 1 (2.00pm – 3.30pm)

University-Industry Collaboration

Author:
Dr. Lim Boon Huat
Managing Director, Rohde & Schwarz Asia, Singapore

Synopsis:
Is there a difference between how industry and academia prepare its employees via-a-vis students for new technology and knowledge? What are the key differences and why are they different? In this speech the notion of applied learning as practiced in the industry setting is expounded in terms of its epistemic culture. It recommends ways to bridge the gap between industry and academia.

Author:
Mr. Sam Liew
Managing Director, Accenture

Synopsis:
Accenture participated in MOE Work-Study Programme with Singapore Institute of Technology (SIT) in 2017. Students will be hired as full-time employee with access to staff benefits and over 9,100 training courses. Work-study programme gives fresh graduates a head-start in careers relating to their discipline of study while they gain a nationally recognised qualification. It poses as an attractive alternative route to students who want to minimise university debt. Companies can play a bigger role in training fresh graduates by adopting a more “mentoring mindset”. We must accept the apprentices as fresh students/ graduates who might not be conversant in the new domain BUT who would be very keen to pick up new skills and contribute. In this disrupted environment, the new apprentices might adapt and do better than most.

Author:
Dr. Ow Chee Chung
CEO, Kwong Wai Shiu Hospital, Singapore

Synopsis:
The MOU between KWSH and SIT broadly covers various platforms for students, faculty, KWSH professionals and patients to engage, innovate and learn from each other. Among the various engagements, there is an ongoing partnership that allows Design students from SIT to work on real greenfield projects in designing community spaces for the elderly. This journey goes beyond the classroom enabling them to gain on-site experience and exposure. Both KWSH and key faculty professionals are available to advise and guide the students along.

The learning does not end from the designed product. The students also go through their journey of sharing/selling their designs, actual design implementation, prototype/product development and even showcase them in exhibitions/conferences.

While we claim that the journey provides applied learning for the students, it is actually an applied learning too for KWSH.

Continuing Education and Training

Author:
Dr. G. Kaveri
Singapore University of Social Sciences

Co-Authors:
Dr. Grace Chee
Singapore University of Social Sciences

Dr. Yvonne McNulty
Singapore University of Social Sciences

Description:
Continuing education in its various forms facilitates interdisciplinary professional development.

Outward Bound Singapore (OBS) is one of the continuing education partners working with Singapore University of Social Sciences to enhance its ‘head, heart, habit’ ethos for students and fulltime faculty. The joint partnership opens up avenues for faculty learning by bringing together two disparate groups of professionals (primarily office-bound academics and wilderness instructors) in a novel setting for an immersive 3 Day/2 Night residential programme. The experience is set in a rugged outdoor environment, comprising kayaking in the sea, trekking, high ropes courses, and camping outdoors in tents, over a stretch of six to eight hours in all weather conditions. Such a platform offers the opportunity for self-discovery, social awareness, confidence, team communication skill, and responsible decision-making that is essential for self-improvement and professional development.

Set against this backdrop, this paper presents the perspectives of faculty participants in the OBS program to elucidate two dimensions of learning. First, the program encouraged faculty participants to re-assess their future-readiness in terms of (a) managing and engaging diverse learners and colleagues in an ever-changing academic landscape, and (b) acquiring an interdependent, collaborative, egalitarian, and inclusive mentality. This then resulted in a second learning related to professional identity (re)development – a strength-based learning where willing faculty courageously confronted (i) assumptions about others, (ii) personal limitations, and (iii) their authentic self.

Author:
Mr. Chinthake Wijesooriya
University of Queensland

Co-Authors:
Prof. Fiona Rohde
University of Queensland

Dr. John Heals
University of Queensland

Dr. Peter Clutterbuck
University of Queensland

Asst. Prof. Arif Perdana
Singapore Institute of Technology

Description:
Employees today switch companies more frequently than their predecessors. Contemporary employments are often contracts and outsourced. Employers would like to maintain relatively less permanent employees.

In this context, employers lose valuable employee knowledge when employees leave the organization. Employers, therefore, face challenges to retain the organizational specific experience. Retaining the experience could help employers to be more consistent and provide better products and services. Technology is capable of capturing and retaining the knowledge. The knowledge can be better captured with the help of the technology and employees.

The research suggests a three-phase approach consisting identification, development, and dissemination of the knowledge. In this research, we propose identifying the important tacit and explicit knowledge through an online collaborative knowledge management system. In such context, it is necessary that organizations look into formal as well as informal online systems that employees use within the functionality of organizations. Such knowledge could help organizations to better understand their own functionalities and needs. A better understanding of the critical organizational knowledge can help further development of organizational systems.

Author:
Dr. David Kwok
Republic Polytechnic

Co-Author:
Mr. Mark Chia
Republic Polytechnic

Description:
While numerous studies on teacher education have reported that teachers’ professional identity could influence how teachers in general teach, develop professionally and approach educational changes, there is limited research on the specific professional identity of polytechnic educators, particularly how it contributes to positive work outcomes.

Therefore, this study aimed to (a) investigate the relationship between professional identity, work engagement and organisational commitment and (b) examine if work engagement would mediate the relationship between professional identity and organisational commitment.

A quantitative approach was employed in this study using a cross-sectional survey design. A sample of 352 polytechnic educators participated in the study by responding to a survey measuring 3 professional identity dimensions (i.e., teaching beliefs, professional socialisation and career progression), work engagement and organisational commitment.

The results of this study showed that the dimensions of professional identity, work engagement and organisational commitment were positive and significantly correlated with each other. Using structural equation modelling, professional socialisation and career progression were found to be significant predictors of work engagement, which in turn significantly influenced organisational commitment. However, teaching beliefs was not a significant predictor of work engagement.

Finally, implications of the study on the professional development of polytechnic educators, along with directions for future research, are discussed in the paper.

Author:
Assoc. Prof. Lim Kok Hwa
Singapore Institute of Technology

Description:
Discussion with industry leads to the development of Process Safety Workshop Series in SIT to help industry to develop capability for the new Safety Case Regime in Singapore.

The training pedagogy for this workshop series integrate hands-on learning at the workplace by collaborating with the company to provide plant walk through.

First of all, in each workshop, trainees will have the opportunity to visit designated areas in the company so that they can apply what they have learned in class room. Relevant case studies were used to allow trainees to discuss on work on possible solutions.

After the workshop, the trainees will need to put up a portfolio to reflect on how the application of their new / revised knowledge can help to prevent accidents and near misses in the course of their work and propose possible improvement to their current work flow to further reduce the risk in their company.

Adaptive Learning / Technology-Enhanced Learning

Author:
Asst. Prof. Victor Wang
Singapore Institute of Technology

Co-Authors:
Assoc. Prof. Lim Wee Han
Singapore Institute of Technology

Assoc. Prof. Karin Avnit
Singapore Institute of Technology

Ms. Catherine Ong
Singapore Institute of Technology

Ms. Regine Lim
Singapore Institute of Technology

Description:
Traditonal lecture style teaching of fundamental subjects such as mathematics are increasingly replaced by flipped classroom learning or blended learning. These subjects are usually taught en masse and can present certain limitations in terms of scalability/logistical constraints. If the audience have a wide varying competency, this traditional method might not be effective. The good students might find the content too easy while the weaker students might struggle to cope – and this often results in students losing interest in the subjects and lecturers struggling to find a compromise to adapt to both ends of the spectrum.

The work described here proposed an alternative pedagogy where an online learning system is created to address the two issues raised. This online learning system is further enhanced by integrating an adaptive algorithm to provide a personalized learning pathway to address the different learning needs, pace and capabilities of every student. The online adaptive learning system positively impacted students’ learning, with evidence of huge improvement between pre-test and post-test scores.

The early pre-test also created awareness to the students that intervention would be needed for them to reach the desired competency level, with blended learning in the form of targeted face-to-face help was rendered to weaker students. With the wide variety of learning resources (videos/e-books/faculty’s explanations/online multimedia) provided to aid in learning, feedback from students showed that their level of confidence in solving mathematics problems has increased significantly. Preliminary longitudinal studies was also conducted with positive learning outcomes achieved in the subsequent trimesters downstream.

Author:
Dr. David Bond
University of Technology, Sydney

Description:
Academics and instructors are now, more than ever, dealing with larger, more diversified classes, as well as students who have grown up in a world which is becoming increasingly digital and personalized (consider how television has moved from a broadcast to streaming model).

To help provide students with an engaging, personalized experience we have developed a number of adaptive accounting lessons based on specific threshold concepts that were identified as important for introductory accounting students.

These lessons sit inside the subject learning management system, and have been designed not as a substitute for face-to-face classes, but as a complement. The design of the lessons allows for students to work through the material at their own pace. The answer a student provides in response to a question will dictate what material the student is provided with next. Correct answers will mean a student can move through quickly, whilst an incorrect answer will lead to review material based on the reason for the incorrect answer.

Participants at the presentation will get a live demonstration of one of the developed lessons, an opportunity to find out more as to how to integrate the lessons within their subjects, as well as information relating to the efficacy of the lessons for student learning.

Author:
Asst. Prof. Victor Wang
Singapore Institute of Technology

Co-Authors:
Ms. Jesline Joy
Singapore Institute of Technology

Dr. Ng Tsu Hao
Singapore Institute of Technology

Prof. Simon Yu
Singapore Institute of Technology

Description:
Gas turbine engines (GTE) are complex turbomachinery that are widely used to generate power and energy. Primarily used in the Aerospace sector, the applications of GTE can also be seen in the Maritime and Energy industry. The design and working mechanism of GTE are complicated and intricate, and this required thorough understanding of fundamental fluid mechanics concepts to fully appreciate how huge amount of energy can be generated through this complex turbo-machinery – with both seemingly inextricable.

Traditional way of learning the classical theories of fluid mechanics is usually de-coupled with applying these knowledge onto such complex problems. The methodology proposed here integrate theory (of fluid mechanics) with technological simulations to recreate an applied learning environment that can replicate an industry-like scenario.

Users can have opportunities to experience hands-on procedure to operate the GTE, complemented with detailed software and tools to see how these equations ‘come-to-life’ through different part of the engine. This is futher enhanced with high fidelity numerical simulations, in the form of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) where the fluid flow can be modelled computationally. This allows users to see and understand complex fluid flow behavior that are otherwise ‘hidden’ if one were to just observe from a real physical model. Users can then fully appreciate how the theoretical equations/concepts can be applied in real-world engineering applications.

As such, users are able to learn and apply the knowledge through different mechanisms, enhancing their learning and hence allow them to gain the required learning objectives and eventual mastery level.

Author:
Asst. Prof. Cheow Wean Sin
Singapore Institute of Technology

Co-Authors:
Assoc. Prof. Lim Kok Hwa
Singapore Institute of Technology

Mr. Prasad Iyer
Singapore Institute of Technology

Description:
The Chemical Engineering and Food Technology (CEFT) cluster in Singapore Institute of Technology (SIT) offers different undergraduate programs – (1) Chemical Engineering, (2) Pharmaceutical Engineering, and (3) Food Technology.

A pre-freshman Chemistry course is necessary because 95% of the matriculated students are polytechnic diploma holders from diverse programs, including marginally related programs such as Mechatronics, Dental Hygiene and Logistics. Chem Quest is an SIT initiative to bridge the knowledge gap between pre-university and freshman Chemistry. In order to reach as many pre-freshmen as possible, Chem Quest is offered as an online course. Recognising that the Chemistry competencies of pre-freshmen is diverse, Chem Quest is also made adaptive, where learners with lower Chemistry competencies undergo a more vigorous course while learners with higher Chemistry competencies experience Chem Quest as a refresher course.

In this presentation, we share the results of this online course, and what we have learnt from its development.

Day 1: Parallel Session 2 (4.00pm – 5.30pm)

Workforce Competencies

Author:
Ms. Kang Huey Ling
Principal / Dean, SMRT Institute, SMRT, Singapore

Synopsis:
To power the future rail network expansion, and a huge demand for competent rail engineers, SMRT recognises the critical need to professionalise the rail engineers. In 2015, SMRT launched the STEP-In and STEP-Up programmes. The programmes equip rail engineers with the knowledge and education necessary to build their careers with a clear path of advancement based on competency.

We adopted a system thinking approach when designing the applied learning programme. The programme design concept focuses on the desired holistic competency development in three areas: core values, railway engineering knowledge, and leadership.

Our partners play an instrumental role in the development and delivery of the STEP programmes. We work with Singapore Institute of Technology, Birmingham Centre for Railway Research and Education from University of Birmingham, and other esteemed programme providers in making the STEP happen.

Author:
Prof. Lim Shih Hui
Group Director of Education, Singapore Health Services

Synopsis:
Health profession education has been evolved from the old style of “structure/process” education to a competency-based health profession education (CBHPE). This CBHPE requires four components: (1) identifying the outcomes, e.g. competent clinicians; (2) defining performance levels for each competency; (3) developing a framework for assessing competencies; and (4) continuous evaluation of CBHPE program to see if it is indeed producing the desired outcomes. Examples of common competency frameworks are the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) Outcomes Project and the CanMEDs roles. Each competency framework starts with broad distinguishable areas of competence that, in the aggregate, define the desired outcomes for a clinician. Within the ACGME framework, there are 6 core competencies: Patient Care, Medical Knowledge, Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Professionalism, Practice-based Learning and Improvement, and Systems-based Practice. However, being competent in the above 6 core competencies of their own specialty or subspecialty is not good enough. With a growing number of people with multiple co-morbidities, an ageing population, and increasing patient expectations, clinicians now need to develop more generic professional capabilities (GPCs) on top of achieving competencies in professional knowledge, skills and values. They have to develop other GPCs which include health promotion & illness prevention, patient safety, quality improvement, teamwork, management and leadership, education & training, and evaluation & clinical application of research. In summary, well designed and structured clinical training programmes will enable us to produce highly competent healthcare professionals who can handle common conditions and certainties. With increasing healthcare need in an aging population, we need to redesign our training programmes to build their capabilities through more holistic clinical education, so that they are better prepared and more capable to handle unexpected conditions and uncertainties.

Author:
Assoc. Prof. Erle Lim
Associate Provost (Undergraduate Education), National University of Singapore

Synopsis:
In this digital age – many institutions of learning (K-12 to tertiary) are leveraging on technology to deliver content, as well as to enhance visualization and facilitate the experiential element of learning. At the same time, there has been a move to embrace craftsmanship and the maker movement. It has been said that “simple is best”, yet others have derided those who do not push technology as Luddites. At the heart of the matter, though, is that any efforts must be predicated on sound pedagogical principles, whilst being mindful of learning outcomes. In this half hour talk, the speaker will highlight efforts at the National University of Singapore to improve education by leveraging on technology, and will discuss whether teachers can leverage on technology to do more than augment the learners’ experiences and increase learning competencies as well

Inquiry-Based Learning

Author:
Dr. Bo Wenjin Vikki
Singapore University of Social Sciences

Co-Author:
Chen De Thanq Victor
National Institute of Education, Singapore

Description:
Research has showed that teaching science in modeling-oriented approach, particularly with interactive simulations will promote student involvement and deep learning (Fulmer & Liang, 2013; Gibson & Chase, 2002).

To date, many interactive simulations have been developed and adopted for classroom practices. The purpose of the present research was to explore science teachers’ experience in simulation implementation and how the experience shaped their future intent to use simulation in class.

This qualitative study focused on 12 science teachers from 7 schools across Singapore. Data were collected through individual interviews, triangulated with teaching plans and student assignments. Regarding past experience of simulation implementation, most teachers adopted simulation for demonstration purpose in a teacher-led instruction. Attempts to let students operate simulation themselves and explore alternative modelling in inquiry-based approach did not seem to work well, due to the shortage of facility access, internet bandwidth and technological knowledge to cover the required syllabus within limited classroom time. Therefore, most teachers’ future intent to use simulation in class was quite weak, especially with the less proficient students who had difficulty understanding simulations.

From this study we concluded that although interactive simulation have shown great potential, to overcome the difficulties of implementation, flipped classroom could be a promising approach. Future studies can investigate how to design learning activities outside class, to engage students in exploring modelling in simulations.

Author:
Assoc. Prof. Mehul Motani
National University of Singapore

Description:
Inquiry based learning is a general approach to education based on the idea of letting students engage actively with concepts. From a pedagogical point of view, the benefits of inquiry based learning are well understood – an active and student centered approach to learning should lead to deeper learning outcomes. It manifests itself in a variety of forms, including problem based learning.

My own approach to inquiry based learning is rooted in asking a myriad of questions and utilizing rich visual examples. Despite the potential of inquiry based learning, I have observed some shortcomings in the depth of the learning outcomes in students. My explanation for this is that the questions and visual examples are designed by me, so, in fact, most of the insight goes to me, and the deep learning happens in my brain, not in my students’ brains. The solution is to give the students significant control and freedom over what they question and visualize, allowing them to bring in and build on their other physical senses and contexts.

In this talk, I will discuss two examples of this augmented inquiry based learning in which students are the architects of their own questions, examples, and visualizations. I have implemented both of these examples in a third year undergraduate engineering course I teach at my University. Both the quantitative outcomes (i.e., students’ final grades) and informal feedback from students was very positive and demonstrated the benefits of allowing students even more freedom in their learning journey.

Author:
Assoc. Prof. Don MacLaurin
Singapore Institute of Technology

Description:
The importance of fostering upper-level thinking skills in University curricula has been well documented by many authors, including the seminal works of Resnick (1987) and Zohar (2004).

The case teaching method is a powerful real-world student-centered learner strategy that sharpens critical thinking, communication, and interpersonal skills essential to higher-order learning. Case method increases student proficiency with organizational and time management skills, written and oral communication, as well as collaboration and team-work (Daly, 2002). Successful case teaching practice requires dedicated case-study classrooms characterized by multi-level tiered horseshoe-shaped seating versus traditional flat floor rooms. This layout minimizes the distance between the instructor and classroom participants, while maximizing student learning participation and interaction by improving conversation acoustics and offering unobstructed sightlines to all in the room. Research by Painter (2009), found that students gave higher ratings to the same course and the same instructor if they took the course in the case study classroom. They rated the instructor as more effective in the quality of the course and course presentations higher. They also reported higher levels of commitment to the program and greater interest in the course material than students taking the same course from the same instructor in the flat floor classroom.

The present study will propose a strategic plan for universities wishing to properly design and implement a combined system of case teaching pedagogy and case teaching classrooms.

Author:
Ms. Tulip Sinha
Srishti Institute of Art, Design & Technology

Co-Author:
Ms. Kavita Arvind
Srishti Institute of Art, Design & Technology

Description:
The use of games to facilitate, moderate and expand teaching-learning experiences within classrooms is an evolving pedagogical practice across domains. Design education has historically used thinking hats, toolkits, and gameplays to introduce design thinking and elicit participation in design process.

Design as a practice is about moving towards a preferred situation, it necessarily involves making as a way to explore these situations alongside thinking about them. Towards this Garnet Hertz with his Critical Making Design Process Cards uses gameplay as a tool to illustrate Matt Ratto’s Critical Making process. It is in this backdrop that we have developed a card game as a pedagogical tool to introduce the concept of ‘Critical making’ in the classroom through immersive gameplay. Replete with strategies, it enables critical enquiry, aids conceptual as well as tangible exploration of diverse ideas, resources and technologies, as a way to challenge status quo. It looks at a seamless convergence of design process and critical making.

The game, created for the sphere of Creative Education (Art/Design/Architecture Education) can be made viable across other domains of professional education. It is adaptable across formats, based on the availability of time and can be reconfigured according to what the educators or learners wish to foreground, providing ample opportunity for the collective emergence of higher order thinking. At the heart of the game lie the tenets of Critical Making; where the process itself is the artifact, arrived at collaboratively and the art of critiquing the primary purpose.

Authentic Assessments / Measurement of Learning Outcomes

Author:
Dr. Tanya MacLaurin
University of Guelph, Canada

Co-Author:
Dr. Donald MacLaurin
Singapore Institute of Technology

Description:
Several studies have identified perceived poor quality assessment feedback in higher education contexts. Huxham (2007) found that less than half (46%) of the University students sampled collected their formative feedback, suggesting that evaluations were clearly not fulfilling the intended role. The present study hypothesizes that typical end-of-semester course evaluations should also consider student perceptions of the learning venue(s) used while taking the course. Numerous studies, such as (Barrett P. et al., 2013) have found that properly designed learning environments are correlated with improved student learning performance. However, specific studies on the role of learning venue design on emerging pedagogical innovations such as active learning, flipped classrooms, and technology enhanced classrooms are not well documented.

This study will propose using a modified survey instrument based on the learning space rating system model (LSRS) developed by (Brown M. et al., 2015) to capture student perceptions of their learning environment. The LSRS instrument is designed to measure a number of attributes categorized within six domains: integration of the specific learning venue within the overall campus context, planning process, support and operations, environmental quality, layout and furnishings, and technology and tools.

Results of the present study can assist institutions of higher learning to improve the quality of learning environments and ensure capital expenditures for new or retrofitted facilities and equipment are wisely appropriated to maximize student learning experiences and outcomes.

Author:
Dr. Lim Kaiyang
Singapore Institute of Technology

Description:
Continual assessments represent the best way to evaluate students’ learning progress. The conventional assessment methods involve students working on problem sets, set out in exam scripts. This format of assessment is boring and unfruitful.

In view of this, we developed an alternative form of assessment, Escape Test, to make assessment more interesting and at the same time, productive in terms of student learning.

In the Escape Test, students are grouped into small groups of five, given a certain scenario and locked up in a room filled with clues, in the form of subject relevant questions. With the subject knowledge and given resources, the students’ main objective is to solve the clues and escape the room, within a stipulated timing. In such assessments, the students are appraised based on subject knowledge as well as work relevant soft skills, including teamwork, leadership and communication. In a preliminary trial with a handful of students, the results were meritorious with the students demonstrating better understanding of the subject matter and greater enthusiasm in learning.

Evidence of this is seen in the final examination where questions are tougher and grades were improved by 20%. Assessment feedback with the students were largely positive with them expressing enhanced appreciation and increased enthusiasm for the subject after the assessment.

Author:
Asst. Prof. Zhou Junqi
Singapore Institute of Technology

Co-Authors:
Dr. Soumyadeb Chowdhury
Aston University

Dr. Jorry Dharmawan
Singapore Institute of Technology

Description:
Digital backchannel systems encourage communication, interaction and engagement in a lecture environment among the students by enabling them to converse their thoughts to the lecturer and their class mates, without interrupting the on-going lecture. Additionally, it helps the instructors to gather real-time feedback, but time constraints impede them to process this feedback and take actions accordingly in time, for a large cohort of students.

To address this issue, we have developed, ‘Interact’, a web and mobile-based backchannel system providing an array of features to both the students and instructors. It allows the students to provide comments, ask questions, and rate their understanding of various concepts (pre-populated by instructor), taught in a lecture.

Additionally, the system employs text analytics using Latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA), to extract topics from the comments made by the students, and aggregate sentiments for each topic using AFINN-165 wordlist.

Finally, visual analytics supplemented with filtering features is employed to visualize: (1) top-ranked ‘m’ topics discussed in ‘n’ lectures; (2) sentiment trends for ‘m’ topics, and ‘n’ lectures, including positive and negative words; (3) popular questions asked in ‘n’ lectures (based upon the rating provided); (4) concepts rated high and low in ‘n’ lectures (based on student understanding).

This paper will present the results of the participatory design process employed by academics from multidisciplinary fields in their lecture experiments. This digitalised interaction will help to improve teaching and develop effective learning, with the aid of automatic processing, summarisation and visualisation.

Author:
Assoc. Prof. Oh Lih-Bin
National University of Singapore

Description:
The use of internships and co-operative education schemes in higher education have increased significantly in recent years. They are considered as effective practice-oriented pedagogies to complement and supplement classroom pedagogy.

A pair internship program was offered for business analytics and information systems undergraduate students at a large Asian university. Two students work collaboratively on substantial projects and meaningful tasks over the duration of 24 weeks. The scope and learning objectives of each internship were co-defined by the host supervisor, faculty members and students. The students’ internship performance was evaluated using formative and summative assessment methods and they received letter grades. Assessments were jointly performed by the host supervisor, academic supervisor, academic moderator, and internship program coordinator. Students were assessed through the submissions of interim/final project reports and a final project presentation. Monthly reflective learning logs and end-of-internship learning journal formed the core academic assignments used to enhance the educational value of the internship.

Analyses from the reflection essays and the post-internship feedback indicated positive experience-based learning outcomes from the internship. Suggestions to improve the design and implementation of internships to better prepare students for the transition from school to professional life are provided.

Day 2: Parallel Session 3 (11.00am – 12.30pm)

Preparing for the Future / Authentic Assessment

Author:
Mr. Eddy Lee
Managing Partner, Coffee Venture

Synopsis:
Up to 800 million people or 30% of global workforce may be displaced from their jobs over the next 13 years according to McKinsey. Self-driving vehicles is no longer an “if” but “when” will thousands of driving jobs become obsolete. Such replacement of manual jobs is further exacerbated by human-beating A.I that threatens accounting, legal, finance or other white-collared jobs. Is there any job left for us in this future? History shows that such fears are largely unwarranted. Workers will adopt new people-oriented skills that machines cannot replace in the near future. Our decreasing working hours, and technological advancements will open up new commerce opportunities, leisure options, and ultimately bring forth better quality of life. The question is how can we prepare ourselves for this future where we do what we are best at, work fewer hours, and start blurring the line between work and play?

Author:
Dr. Steven Wong
President, Association of Information Security Professionals (AiSP)

Synopsis:
This presentation provides a broad overview on the cybersecurity manpower landscape in Singapore and will go into some details of the requirements and standards for the education and training of a capable cybersecurity workforce. Examples will also be shown on how the various stakeholders in the cybersecurity eco-system should collaborate to facilitate such training through mechanisms such as the AiSP Information Security Body-of-Knowledge as well as various industry certifications/accreditation schemes.

Author:
Assoc. Prof. Lakshminarayanan Samavedham
Fellow of NUS Teaching Academy, National University of Singapore

Synopsis:
Many macro forces are beginning to shape the discourse on what education should be for the 21st century. These include: (a) the commoditization of knowledge, (b) the disappearance of traditional jobs and the emergence of new professions that underline the need to engage in lifelong learning, (c) the increasing availability and affordability of information and communication technology that facilitates anytime, anywhere learning and (d) the need to develop higher order thinking, working and articulation skills needed to tackle the grand challenges we face locally and globally.

Among the various components that critically impact student learning, assessment stands out because students perceive and experience the curriculum mainly through formative and summative assessments. What to assess, when to assess, how to assess are critical design questions for a thoughtful educator. Given the leverage of assessments and the affordances of mobility and technology, it is important and possible for educators to make the assessments as authentic as is possible.

This talk intends to provide an overview of the area of authentic assessments as relevant to students of science and engineering at tertiary institutions. It will also introduce a framework for authentic assessments and provide examples of specific practices adopted by award-winning teachers in this regard.

Work-Based Learning

Author:
Assoc. Prof. Liew Chin Kian
Singapore Institute of Technology

Co-Authors:
Mr. Rajkumar Abdul Rasheed Kan
Singapore Institute of Technology

Mr. Chew Han Guan
Singapore Institute of Technology

Mr. Chia Zong Lin
Singapore Institute of Technology

Description:
The Non-Destructive Testing Society Singapore (NDTSS) has recently launched in mid-2017 a new local certification scheme for NDT practitioners known as SGNDT, which is audited by the Singapore Accreditation Council (SAC).

The Singapore Institute of Technology (SIT) is an Authorised Training Organisation (ATO) for SGNDT and is the first university in the country to provide a learning pathway for engineering students to gain a recognised NDT professional certification.

This is a novel approach that combines the integration of an industrial NDT training curriculum in an engineering degree, as well as a one-year work-study programme to qualify students to undertake the SGNDT professional certification. This learning pedagogy and certification opportunity are further extended to working adults through continuing education and training.

Author:
Mr. Ye Jian-Hong
National Taiwan Normal University

Co-Author:
Ms. Fan Jing-Yun
Tainan University of Technology

Description:
This study aims to investigate the correlation between off-campus internship satisfaction, incentive System on their intent-to-stay among the fashion design students in Taiwan. Taking the joint training solution for industry-academic-government-research as an example, the solution started in 2013, and there is two groups of professional technical talents for both shoes design & bags design fields to receive the training. This study takes students that participate in joint training solution for industry-academic-government-research as the participants. The study applied the questionnaire of off-campus internship satisfaction, incentive System and, intent-to-stay to process the test and use SPSS 23.0 statistical software to carry out the reliability analysis and validity analysis, before using the PLS statistic software to process the path analysis. The results showed: (1) There was a significant positive correlation among off-campus internship satisfaction, incentive System, and intent-to-stay. (2) Most students feel satisfied with the off-campus internship and incentive System. (3) Although students were satisfied with the off-campus internship provider, there was a higher turnover rate due to personal reason. (4) There was higher proportion of students who engaged in another field after leaving here.

Author:
Ms. Faith Ong
Ngee Ann Polytechnic

Description:
Aim In this pilot study, we explore the effectiveness of field-based instructions for students to learn the principles of Asset-Based Community Development (ABCD).

Methodology The participants were 38 students (aged 17 to 20 years) taking the module “Community Psychology” in the Diploma in Psychology Studies at Ngee Ann Polytechnic. Attached for four weeks to community workers of two organisations that practise ABCD, students observed the application of ABCD concepts.

Qualitative data, in the form of students’ reflection essays and in-class group reflections, was collected and analysed thematically. Findings The analysis revealed three key themes: (i) field-based learning provide authentic opportunities for students to see the application of ABCD principles and techniques in real-life community setting (“There is much more learning than being in a classroom setting.”); (ii) interaction with community members reduced negative stereotypes and heightened perception of their strengths (“interacting with the community, with the view of identifying their strengths and asset – as instructed by the community worker – allows me to go beyond stereotypes and realised that there are gems in the community.”); (iiI) shadowing practitioners of ABCD challenged students’ perception of diminishing kampong spirit and opened their eyes to strategies for bringing the community together.

Conclusion: Field-based attachment enables students to see practitioners of ABCD in action and can bring about changed focus from deficits and needs to assets and priorities. Reflection activities are beneficial in connecting students’ hands-on experiences to theories of ABCD.

Author:
Ms. Jing-Yun Fan
Tainan University of Technology

Co-Author:
Mr. Ye Jian-Hong
National Taiwan Normal University

Description:
This research conducted a case study that focused on exploring the outcomes of collaborative teaching of the industry expert in leather bag design course at university of technology in Taiwan.

To achieve the purpose, the use of literature review, questionnaire survey and qualitative interviews and other methods to collect information. According to literature results, to develop the questionnaire of “the collaborative teaching implementation of effectiveness of the industry experts in fashion leather bag design course at university of technology” and interview subject headings as the research tools.

The study sampling was focus on 2016-2017 school semester of the collaborative teaching of the industry expert at the department of fashion design students, and the study total have 59 students as sampling. The conclusions drawn from the research are as follows: 1) collaborative teaching may enhance the practical operation ability of students, 2) the industry expert and the course teacher may teach and learn together, 3) the collaborative teaching makes the exchange of industry and academia cooperation, 4) the collaborative teaching obtains community recognition.

On this basis, the researcher suggests: 1) to expand performance the collaborative teaching activities, 2) to effective of industry experts teaching content and teaching materials, 3) to strengthen the relationship between industry and academia links, 4) to implement of collaborative teaching, 5) to substantial pool of experts data retrieval system.

Service Learning / Project-Based Learning

Author:
Assoc. Prof. May Lim Sok Mui
Singapore Institute of Technology

Co-Authors:
Assoc. Prof. Tan Bhing Leet
Singapore Institute of Technology

Mr. Lim Hua Beng
Singapore Institute of Technology

Mr. Galvyn Goh
Singapore Institute of Technology

Description:
The use of experiential learning in occupational therapy (OT) education is reported to be effective in inculcating a more holistic understanding of disability and empathy towards persons with disabilities (PWDs) in countries such as Canada.

This study aimed at examining the effectiveness of an experiential learning project through learning from PWDs in Singapore. In a cohort of 58 first-year OT students, small groups comprising of three students were paired with a PWD. The students met with a PWD for three visits to observe and participate alongside in daily living tasks, work and leisure within community. Students completed reflective journal after each visit. To encourage horizontal integration across other modules taught in the semester, students submitted a report integrating OT theory and concepts in other modules (such as Psychology and Health System) applied to the PWD that they observed.

An adaptation of the Multi-Dimensional Attitudes Scale towards PWDs (MAS) was used in the Pre and Post phases to measure attitudes towards disability. Focus groups were conducted to gather feedback at the end of the project. Improvements in scores were found comparing pre-post in all three subscales of Affect, Cognition and Behaviour, p< 0.001, with effect size ranging from 0.42 to 0.54. From the focus groups (n= 17), the students reported changes in their perceptions as they discovered what PWDs were capable of doing, such as taking on leadership positions. Experiential learning is helpful when students learn from PWDs and apply what they learn in the classroom to community observation.

Author:
Asst. Prof. Cheong Kang Hao
Singapore Institute of Technology

Co-Authors:
Assoc. Prof. Wang Peng Cheng
Singapore Institute of Technology

Assoc. Prof. An Hui
Singapore Institute of Technology

Assoc. Prof. Alvin Chan
Singapore Institute of Technology

Ms. Janice Kang
Singapore Institute of Technology

Dr. Davy Cheong
Singapore Institute of Technology

Mr. Anthony Chee
Singapore Institute of Technology

Prof. Tan Thiam Soon
Singapore Institute of Technology

Description:
Strong engineering capabilities will be required more so than ever, to drive innovation and productivity in Singapore. However, the motivation for students to study science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) appears to be diminishing in recent years.

In the present pilot project, we aim to pique young peoples’ interest in the STEM by getting them to work with our students, many just a few years senior to them, on realistic hands-on projects. In this way, these students will know a good STEM foundation will lead to skills for many exciting innovations, with our students as their role model. The Young Engineers’ Space (YES!) initiative was developed to be an applied learning platform for secondary school students from neighbourhood school to work with SIT staff/faculty/undergraduates on meaningful STEM projects that also have linkages to the community.

The YES!’s curriculum will first expose these students to robotics training and through this, allows them to pick up simple programming and reasoning skills as well as some understanding of kinematics and sensor technologies. The students will then use their robotics knowledge to solve a design engineering challenge with industrial relevance. Finally, we will involve these secondary school students to support SIT students in industrial projects led by our faculty.

During the presentation, we will share how this service-learning has been used to integrate learning, industry and community engagement. Learning points from the different stakeholders will also be shared during the presentation.

Author:
Ms. Jean Ong Yin Ning
Ngee Ann Polytechnic

Co-Authors:
Dr. Juliet Choo
Ngee Ann Polytechnic

Ms. Lee Lia Irwin Ya’acob
Ngee Ann Polytechnic

Ms. Janice Foo
Ngee Ann Polytechnic

Ms. Tiong Shiuan Shiuan
Ngee Ann Polytechnic

Ms. Tan Bee Yan
Ngee Ann Polytechnic

Mr. Tan Yew Kong
Ngee Ann Polytechnic

Description:
The participants were 132 Year 2 students from the Diploma in Early Childhood Education who studied the module “Developing School-Family-Community Partnership”.

Through a service-Learning pedagogy, students worked with six key community partners to deliver a variety of projects, some involving direct interaction with children and families. Students attempted to apply theories such as Bronfenbrenner’s Ecological Model of Development and Epstein’s theory of six types of parental involvement. Communication, negotiation and problem-solving skills are honed when novel situations arise during the collaboration. All students participated in formative (discussion during tutorial) and summative reflections (written assignment using the DEAL model of critical reflection) to help students connect academic knowledge to service and reflect on their readiness for the workplace. They completed a survey measuring perceived quality of reflection activities, connection between academic contents and service, and career preparation through service-learning. A Pearson Product moment correlation was computed. The analysis showed that perceived quality of reflection is significantly related to academic connection (r=.82, p<.01) and to career preparation (r=.65, p<.01).

The results suggest that service-learning can be an effective pedagogy for pre-service early childhood educators to acquire applied knowledge of school-family-community partnership, raise their awareness towards community as a network and resource for families. These are necessary skills for working in the early childhood settings. This study is funded by Singapore Ministry of Education Tertiary Education Research Fund: 2 TR 17

Author:
Mr. Brad Franklin Blackstone
Singapore Institute of Technology

Co-Author:
Assoc. Prof. Lim Hwee Hoon
Singapore Institute of Technology

Description:
In assisting university students in developing communicative competence for their future workplace, a range of skills need to be addressed and practiced, including writing, speaking, collaboration, interpersonal communication, creativity, media literacy, and research and inquiry (Jaidev & Blackstone, 2016; National Research Council, 2012).

This presentation describes how modules focused on interpersonal communication within two university programmes –- systems engineering and hospitality business – implemented similarly innovative research project designs using an interactive multimodal learning environment model in order to encourage students to ‘actively explore real-world problems and challenges’ within industry-specific contexts ‘to acquire deeper knowledge.’

One novel design element of the team-based research project in each module was the use of individual blogs for sharing project-related writing assignments (verbal/visual mode). Another element was a series of oral tasks: an individual project pitch and then a team-based oral presentation (verbal/nonverbal/visual).

The other element was a student-generated ‘instructional’ video (verbal/nonverbal/visual) through which teams were expected to peer-teach an aspect of their respective problem-solution within the context of the formal presentation.

This paper will explain how working through integrated tasks in an interactive multimodal environment helped students apply their learning of interpersonal communication principles and it will describe student attitudes toward that effort. Finally, the presenters will share how “student understanding can be enhanced by the addition of non-verbal knowledge representations to verbal explanations” (Moreno & Mayer, 2007, p. 310).

Day 2: Parallel Session 4 (2.15pm – 3.45pm)

Work-Based Learning

Author:
Mr. Khor Boon Hong
Assurance Partner, Baker Tilly TFW LLP

Synopsis:
Baker Tilly TFW has partnered with the Singapore Institute of Technology to host students in its work study programme. As a mentor of these students, Boon Hong has seen numerous benefits and challenges faced during their stint with the firm. He has observed that accounting students of today are well prepared by their institutions to be equipped with skills to tackle the challenges of today’s workplace. However, with the emergence of disruptive technologies, will the current pedagogy adopted by local institutions stand the test of time? As disruptive technologies continue to displace jobs around the globe, how can we be ready to ride the wave of disruption? He will share some of his thoughts on future challenges of the accounting profession.

Author:
Ms. Goh Sei Yi
Director, Talent Management, Singtel

Synopsis:
As a leading Info-Communications Technology player competing in the global market, Singtel invests significantly in identifying, developing and grooming young talent for the digital economy. On an annual basis, Singtel partners with polytechnics and universities to offer, recruit and develop about 250+ interns, scholars and graduates through various development programs that are designed to build a pipeline of talents with the right mix of technical and soft skills to thrive and eventually lead in the age of digital disruption. This sharing will cover the why, how and what of Singtel’s young talent capability building strategy and plan – as it strives to go beyond regional telco industry to win in emerging technologies like cyber security, analytics, IOT and cloud computing.

Author:
Mr. David Cheng
Head, Nutrition Innovation Centre, Asia Pacific, DSM

Synopsis:
In today’s world, teaching is a huge challenge for both educators and students. Using a hands-on approach instead of just teaching the theory, it removes barriers to engagement and increases participation from the students. The interaction between teachers and students improve and builds a stronger teacher-student relationship. Learning is a lifelong journey and an important one.

Simulation and Technology-Enhanced Learning

Author:
Dr. Desi Arisandi
Singapore Institute of Technology

Co-Author:
Ms. Janet Tan
Singapore Institute of Technology

Description:
One significant challenge in today’s business world is data explosion due to the advanced computer technology that is making huge data collection possible. In relation to the accountant profession, the more challenging matter is how to make use and make sense out of the enormous amount of data from general business operations. Responding to the emerging technology and innovation, the accounting industry and the business entities demand substantial changes in accounting education.

The use of data analytics for education case study is one of important methods to prepare the future generation against the fast changing world of information and communications technology.

This paper demonstrates the use of data visualization application to perform basic audit procedures and construct management reports by learning about data attributes, data dimension, color coordinate, graphs and charts, and basic statistics in classroom. Interactive data visualization capable to assist users to view, explore and transform data into valuable insights for decision makers. The case study is developed based on the popular online application (AirBnb) transactions data that blend nicely with the students’ knowledge hence entice students participation in class discussion, problem solving question, and final project. The primary contribution of this case study is to fill up the gap of accounting teaching material in relation to data analytics as many accounting faculty have not had first-hand experience with the topic, additionally sample curriculum and textbooks in the subject are not readily available for business users.

Author:
Dr. Ng Tsu Hao
Singapore Institute of Technology

Co-Authors:
Ms. Jesline Joy
Singapore Institute of Technology

Dr. Lim Yau Shiang
Singapore Institute of Technology

Assoc. Prof. Victor Wang
Singapore Institute of Technology

Prof. Simon Yu
Singapore Institute of Technology

Description:
Singapore aims to be a regional Aerospace Hub with companies such as Rolls Royce, Pratt & Whitney and ST Aerospace in its pool. To prepare students for the aerospace industry, it is essential to educate students on the working principles of the gas turbine engines. Due to high costs as well as infrastructure constraints, it can be challenging to implement multiple sets of equipment for students’ learning.

A Simulation Education Package has been developed to better prepare students for classes, before conducting the actual experiments. The software is able to help students from varied backgrounds to attain a common understanding of the working principles. With better awareness, it would also be safer for the students to operate the gas turbine equipment.

The interactive education software consists of bite-sized video lectures, tutorials, simulated results, animations and quizzes to help students understand gas turbine operations starting from basic laws of thermodynamics. Actual experimental results have been pre-collected and stored in a database, the students could use the interactive software to experiment with parameters to understand their effects on gas turbine engine, similar to operating the actual equipment in the laboratory. The software can also be used as a material for “flipped classroom” teaching methodology so that students could acquire basic knowledge before the lesson, and more in-depth discussions could be stimulated during class.

The results from virtual machines are based on actual data collected from a real SR 30 engine and could be used in place for actual laboratory classes when necessary.

Author:
Mr. Cheah Sin Moh
Singapore Polytechnic

Description:
This paper shares the experience of the teaching team from the Diploma in Chemical Engineering of Singapore Polytechnic in using EduTech Tools and Dynamic Simulation to enhance students learning of HAZOP (hazards and operability) which had traditionally posed challenges for both lecturers teaching the topic and students learning it.

The topic is covered in a Year 3 core module entitled Plant Safety & Loss Prevention. HAZOP is an important process hazard analysis tool taught in most if not all chemical engineering program, as it inculcates in students the critical and systems thinking skills needed for operating a chemical plant in a safe and efficient manner.

This paper briefly introduces readers to HAZOP, and challenges in teaching it. It then presents basic information on EduTech Tools and benefits of using dynamic simulation in chemical engineering education. The paper then presents work done by the author to improve students’ learning of HAZOP. The emphasis here is to leverage on the affordance made available by EduTech Tools and dynamic simulation to pedagogically scaffold and support student learning, with examples of various tools used.

This is followed by brief discussion of students’ performance in the module, and conclude with reflections on key learning points from the author.

Author:
Asst. Prof. Neelakantam Venkatarayalu
Singapore Institute of Technology

Co-Author:
Mr. Prasad Iyer
Singapore Institute of Technology

Description:
Visualization of concepts, in general reinforces the understanding of the otherwise abstract topics in mathematics. Enhancing student ability to visualize concepts becomes critical for the subsequent learning of discipline specific topics, where understanding of such abstract concepts is pivotal.

In electrical engineering, Electricity and Magnetism is one topic where the physics covered is often imparted heavily in the language of vector calculus. In general, students find the concepts hard to understand and interpret due to the seemingly abstract and mathematical nature of the topic. The conceptual understanding of the topics is often shallow due to the limited capabilities of traditional teaching media such as textbooks and slides in providing visualization capabilities. It is, therefore, essential to bridge the gap between procedural and conceptual knowledge in mathematics, to relate to the corresponding representations of the physical phenomena through an effective E-Learning platform.

To this end, a set of simple, interactive Math and Physics Visualization platform, with a collection of e-learning materials has been developed. The objective to expose, entice and engage students to seek deeper understanding of the concepts by providing an opportunity for experiential learning through an interactive platform.

In this paper, we present the development and adoption of the platform using a tool capable of symbolic computations, powerful visualization capabilities and easier deployment possibilities. A qualitative assessment on the effectiveness of the platform on the learning experience based on student feedback shall be presented.

Day 2: Parallel Session 5 (4.15pm – 5.45pm)

Project-Based Learning

Author:
Assoc. Prof. Alan Wong Wai Pong
Singapore Institute of Technology

Co-Authors:
Ms. Jade Soh
Singapore Institute of Technology

Mr. Galvyn Goh
Singapore Institute of Technology

Description:
Project-based learning is a student-centred collaborative learning approach. It involves a student project to address a problem or an issue, with learning initiatives entirely developed and driven by students, facilitated by instructors, and an end-product that is relevant and helpful to the problem or issue.

In higher education, its application has mainly been in final-year project but not in other academic subjects. Therefore this study examines its effect on teaching an interprofessional module on Health Systems in university health sciences programmes.

Two hundred and sixty-five eligible students were initially invited to participate with eventually 98 valid pairs of baseline and end-of-course responses (37%) for analysis. Baseline data were collected in Week 3 of the trimester and end-of-course data in Week 12. The main learning variables are Revised Learning Indicators Scale(RLIS), motivational subscale of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire(MSLQ) and Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale-Nursing Education(SDLRS-NE). Of the 98 participants, 75(76.5%) were female and 23(23.5%) male, 83(84.7%) Chinese, 50(51.0%) had A levels and 48(49.0%) polytechnic diplomas. The RLIS scores decreased significantly (p=0.028). Of the components of motivational subscale of MSLQ, significant difference was found in expectancy (self-efficacy for learning, p=0.048) and affect (text anxiety, p = 0.022), but not in value beliefs. Of the three subscales of SDLRS-NE, only self-control was significant (p=0.009). Within a university health sciences setting, project-based learning significantly raises independence in learning and reduces learning reliant on perceived relationship with instructors.

Author:
Mrs. Alison Gibb
University of Glasgow

Co-Author:
Dr. Thomas Anker
University of Glasgow

Description:
Businesses often complain that university graduates require more soft skills and professional experience when they enter the workplace (Mitchell, Skinner & White, 2010). Likewise, students and professional accreditation bodies ask for more experiential and problem-based learning to be embedded in the curriculum to enhance relevance and employability (Green and Farazmand, 2012). These observations resonate with academic research, demonstrating that effective teaching often requires instructors that are experienced practitioners (Pratt & Collins, 2000).

With this in mind, the authors developed a new course at the Adam Smith Business School, University of Glasgow, which challenges students to apply theory and concepts on a business case for an external client.

This presentation focusses on how the course, International Marketing Consultancy, was designed and delivered in cooperation with Accenture financial services, New York, and an ex-industry practitioner with over 20 years’ experience of marketing. Drawing on the teaching team’s own research into value creation and consumer behaviour, this is a paradigm example of a research-led course with a strong experiential and practical dimension, demonstrating how scholarly research can enhance employability through teaching-partnerships with industry. The course challenges students to work in small teams as consultants on a strategic marketing case for Accenture.

The summative assessment combines a group presentation of solutions to a panel of experts and individual annotated Power-Point reports, offering the opportunity to critically reflect on all key decisions developed throughout the team work.

Author:
Assoc. Prof. Alfred Tan
Singapore Institute of Technology

Co-Author:
Assoc. Prof. Alan Wong
Singapore Institute of Technology

Description:
The Singapore Institute of Technology, in collaboration with the University of Glasgow, Mechanical Design Engineering and Mechatronics programmes, co-delivers a 8 month Final Year Project (FYP).

FYP is designed to allow final year students to apply the theoretical knowledge they have learned from class and further it with self-acquired new knowledge if necessary. Each project is either proposed by an academic supervisor by an academic faculty in collaboration with an industry partner. Each student works on one project title originated from a faculty supervisor. Some supervisors may propose many projects in hope that some will interest students enough to select as their top choice.

Occasionally, this may result in too many projects successfully allocated or even next to none. In order to address the unexpected outcome of the allocation process, a few faculty members can group together to co-supervise students in a thematic team. Students in such cluster greatly benefit from cross-pollination of ideas and shared learning and resources from both faculty and their peers.

One such example presented is a small group of about 10-15 students supervised under a theme called Healthcare Engineering Community (HEC). We present observations based on the past three years of experience in managing the HEC group of students, with some of the best practices in supervising cross-disciplinary projects. Insights to maintaining the quality of the co-supervised projects with view of student’s learning will be shared. Existing challenges and new challenges that arise from the collaborative learning approach will also be discussed.

Author:
Asst. Prof. George Liu Zhaoping
Singapore Institute of Technology

Description:
With millennials’ decreased tolerance for lecture-style courses, educators are facing increasing challenges of adapting to the learning preferences of millennial students (Prensky, 2001).

Many tools and pedagogies such as “flipped classroom” have been used to engage the millennials (Lee, Lim, & Kim, 2017). However, adapting traditional lectures to multi-media modes is not always successful and some students have trouble adjusting to the new on-line learning environment (Roehl, Reddy, & Shannon, 2013).

Is it possible to keep the main structure of a traditional lecture but deliver it in a more engaging mode? Peer teaching has been proposed as one such tool (Colvin, 2007). The objective of this case study is to describe the peer teaching framework of a Hospitality Business module (i.e., Cruise Management), evaluate the effectiveness of the new model, and analyze the key success factors of designing a peer teaching framework. Data come from instructor’s participated observation and students’ reflection journals.

The results suggest that the empowerment of students to take charge of course delivering has created an easy environment for developing new and interesting teaching models. Those models have led to higher level of student engagement. For example, student instructors modified the popular table game Monopoly and created a new game, which was then used as a guiding instrument to deliver the topic of Global Cruise Regions. The findings of this study will help educators to optimize the procedure of using peer teaching as an engaging pedagogy and co-create innovative and engaging teaching models together with millennial students.

Interdisciplinary Integration

Author:
Dr. Gregor Lange
National University of Singapore

Co-Author:
Ms. Crystal Lim
National University of Singapore

Description:
This presentation will outline the unique curriculum and outcomes of the Roots and Wings programme.

Roots & Wings is NUS’ groundbreaking undergraduate programme centering on personal and interpersonal effectiveness skills. Since its launch in January 2016, over 6500 students have participated in Roots and Wings. In steady state, the programme will be rolled out to 7,000 NUS freshmen per year as an essential part of the NUS educational experience. Roots & Wings provides students with practical techniques that are based on the latest findings in neuroscience, psychology, and leadership research, so that they may maximise their potential in their academic journey, career, and personal life.

The programme is highly experiential and applied, utilising a blended learning methodology. Positive outcomes ( e.g. resilience, enhanced focus and clarity, increased social and emotional intelligence) will be presented.

Author:
Ms. Susan Khoo
Nanyang Technological University

Co-Author:
Dr. Christopher Hill
Nanyang Technological University

Description:
The overarching goal of English for Specific Academic Purposes (ESAP) is to equip students with the relevant skills to communicate within a specific academic context related to their field of study. This involves learning transfer, when learners apply their ESAP knowledge to new situations and contexts.

In this presentation we focus on the learning transfer of 27 undergraduate Engineering students taking an ESAP writing course, and highlight the extent to which these students’ ESAP learning was transferred to their Engineering-specific courses. The research questions which we explore in our talk are: (i) To what extent does transfer of the learning outcomes of the ESAP course occur in students’ course-specific programs?; and (ii) What are the specific contexts in which this transfer occurs, and what is the extent to which this transfer is sustained?; (iii) Do language, educational background and academic performance of students influence learning transfer? In our exploration of these research questions, we present the results of student’s self-identified transfer and consider how this correlates with any instances transfer observed in their work and we measure this against students’ language, education background and academic performance to see if these factors play a part in learning transfer in order to better understand how students’ perception of their own learning influences learning transfer.

This study uses a longitudinal research method that combines the participants’ written reflections, with questionnaire surveys and individual interviews, along with written assignment samples from both the participants’ ESAP course as well as their Engineering courses.

Author:
Dr. Andrew Straun
University of Glasgow

Co-Author:
Dr. Scott Ramsay
University of Glasgow

Description:
Engagement in undergraduate research is one of the key determiners in continued academic success and development into advanced study (Laursen et al., 2012). Research skills – including critical thinking ability and data management skills – are essential, but there is also increasing pressure for undergraduate students to successfully communicate these findings/skills to broad, interdisciplinary audiences.

Our paper discusses two Glasgow-based projects, Let’s Talk About [X] and [X]position (information available at www.talkaboutx.net), to develop undergraduate students’ industry readiness and transferable skills through interdisciplinary conference presentations and research journal writing. The uniqueness of our projects lies in the format of the [X] initiative: undergraduate students are given intensive, ongoing mentoring throughout the process (from abstract submission, through paper creation, to presentation/publication) by PhD students from radically different subject backgrounds (e.g. An astrophysics undergraduate was mentored by an English Literature PhD).

The end result is a student presentation or a student research article that communicates the result of undergraduate research to interdisciplinary audiences (including academics, employers and the general public) t. Run by the Learning Enhancement and Academic Development Service (LEADS) at the University of Glasgow, the [X] initiative provides a unique opportunity to create employment-ready graduates capable of interdisciplinary communication through student-led creations.

Our paper presents evaluation of the impact of the [X] initiative on empowering student success through scaffolded real-world application and engagement with real-world challenges.

Author:
Mr. Andreas Dewanto
National University of Singapore

Co-Authors:
Dr. Chammika N.B. Udalagama
National University of Singapore

Dr. Lieu Zi Zhao
National University of Singapore

Dr. Linda Sellou
National University of Singapore

Dr. Lim Zhi Han
National University of Singapore

Assoc. Prof. Liou Yih-Cherng
National University of Singapore

Description:
The Special Programme in Science was established to nurture aspirant scientists toward the growing R&D demands of the 21st-century knowledge‐based economy [1].

The programme developed the Integrated Science Curriculum which prepares students for a multidisciplinary, computation-driven, and collaborative nature of science in the 21st-century.

The curriculum comprises of 6 courses, which further divided into 4 thematic-based courses (namely Atoms to Molecules, The Cell, The Earth, and The Universe), and 2 research-based courses (namely Discovering Science and Integrated Science Project).

The thematic-based courses teach students problem-solving skills in multidisciplinary science. For instance, The Cell teaches cells’ dynamics where students are expected to grow their own bacteria, write their own programme to track the random motion of the bacteria under microscope, and analyse the data to understand the Brownian nature of the cells’ motion [2]. The Cell thus pulls together concepts from biology, computing, and physics to understand dynamical nature of the cells.

The research-based courses, meanwhile, provide students with first-hand experience on wet-lab research. From literature review, to formulating hypothesis, to designing experimental setup, to conducting the actual experimentation, and eventually to discussing and presenting the result, students are given opportunity to apply scientific methodology and practice their research and communication skill while working on projects at the frontier of scientific discovery in the actual research laboratory setting. All in all, the curriculum utilizes education technology and peer learning to deliver an active and effective learning [3].

In this presentation, we shall elaborate how SPS implements Integrated Science Curriculum.

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